Tag: game mechanics

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  • Definitions

    Some of the terms regularly used in the MEGS rules can get a little confusing; here are some definitions. If anything needs defining or elucidation, comment here! You can get a list of everything posted to this section by looking at the "*definitions*" …

  • Time

    Time is what turns kittens into cats! 0 APs of time is the equivalent of 4 seconds. It's the length of one round of Combat; everything that round happens in 4 seconds. (We often fudge a little when it comes to dialogue.) In 0 APs of time, a Character …

  • Desperation Recovery

    bq). Ever notice how heroes are always able to regain consciousness in the nick of time when their lives are on the line? How many times has an unconscious hero been placed in a life-threatening situation, only to wake up just in time to save himself? …

  • Information Measurement

    Actually, there are two kinds of information measurement: the one this page is about (essentially "quantity of data"), and the amount gotten via Perception Check/Detective skill check/Gadgetry skill check/trying to use the Charisma skill on a target. …

  • Knockback

    *Knockback*, in our campaign, has two definitions: as a side effect of physical combat, and "*on purpose*". Certain Powers can prevent, or to some measure negate, Knockback in either case. Every attack that does Physical damage has the potential to …

  • Last Ditch Defense

    Whenever a Character takes damage, the Player may *immediately* spend Hero Points to reduce the amount of damage sustained. In our [[Genre | genre]], two Hero Points spent will take away one RAP of damage. The maximum amount of Hero Points that can be …

  • Genre

    The *Genre* used for the campaign determines several factors, such as the likelihood of Killing Combat (and whether heroes suffer a penalty for entering into Killing Combat), the cost of increasing the relevant statistics on [[Terms on the Character Sheet …

  • Pushing Automatic Actions

    This rule applies to a character straining to overuse what would normally be an Automatic Action, based on an Automatic Power or an Attribute. (The version of this super-effort for Dice Actions is given elsewhere: it's the one where someone pays one HP …

  • Recovery Check

    Recovery is a Dice Action; remember that a PC normally only gets one of those per Combat Phase, and none during Full Dodge. When it's time to recover from some sort of harm, the Player makes a Action Check using the appropriate [[Terms on the Character …

  • Resting Recovery

    When a character gets better without medical treatment, emergency intervention, or other special sorts of intercession, the character generally heals by resting, and avoiding more opportunities for Bad Things to Happen, for a certain period of time. …

  • Stun

    A character who takes an amount of damage equal to or greater than his Body, Spirit, or Mind from a single attack -- regardless of the Current Condition being targeted -- is Stunned by that blow, even if the blow does not knock the target unconscious …

  • Zero APs

    In DC Heroes, all measurements are made in APs, and actually cover a range from "just barely above the top of the previous AP size" to a maximum amount. For mathematical purposes, the base measurement of any measurable concept is 0 APs of _whatever_. 1 …

  • Charging Attack

    A *Charging Attack* is an attempt to run, fly, or leap into an opponent in order to use the velocity of the move to cause additional damage. Bullrushes, tackles, car crashes, and blitzes are all Charging Attacks. The attacking Character must move at …

  • Critical Blow

    A *Critical Blow* is an attempt to direct an attack at a weak point in the target's defenses. Like a "called shot" in other systems, it's harder to connect this kind of attack, but a successful Critical Blow will also do more damage. Statesman is likely …

  • Block

    A *Block* is an attempt by the defender to interpose some object between an incoming blow and his person. (Villains are fond of using PCs as the interposed object.) If the Block maneuver succeeds, the object takes the damage instead of the defender. A …

  • Dodge

    There are three kinds of Dodge in this game. The first kind is "default". It's the automatic OV/RV that any Character, independently-moving Gadget, or object gets whenever attacked, with no real useful enhancements. It's often also known as "fail to …

  • Flailing Attack

    A *Flailing Attack* is pretty much the opposite of a [[Critical Blow]]: it's a slow, deliberate attack that emphasizes landing a blow at all over inflicting damage. This is particularly useful for keeping an opponent's attention! It could be a feint, a …

  • Grappling Attack

    When one person grabs another person in combat with intent to restrict the second person's movements, that's a *Grappling Attack*. Mostly this is a close melee-range war of Strength and Dexterity, though certain powers such as Paralysis, Telekinesis*, and …

  • Laying Back

    Only available to the character with *the highest* Initiative of the phase, this is an Automatic Action; it can be used in conjunction with any non-Initiative option under [[Combat Maneuvers]]. If the Initiative winner chooses to *Lay Back*, any …

  • Pressing the Attack

    Only available to the character with *the highest* Initiative of the phase, this is an Automatic Action; it can be used in conjunction with any non-Initiative option under [[Combat Maneuvers]]. If the Initiative winner chooses to *Press the Attack*, …

  • Multi-Attack

    A *Multi-Attack* is an attempt to attack more than one target in the same phase. It's resolved with a single Dice Action. The OV of the attack is the highest OV among the defenders, modified by (B) in the handy table below. The RV of the attack is the …

  • Devastating Attack

    A *Devastating Attack* is an all-out attempt to overwhelm the target's defenses. Essentially, it's a more powerful (and difficult) version of the Critical Blow. If Thunder Strike decides to aim his hammer at the one spot where all pieces of the "Zeus …

  • Sweep Attack

    *Sweep Attacks* are basically a form of [[Multi-Attack]] employing physical objects. [[:thunderstrike-1 | Thunderstrike]] will be *_happy_* to demonstrate. One moment while Thunder Strike acquires a steel girder, _without_ knocking the building down on …

  • Pulling a Punch

    Sometimes, [[Knockback]] is a highly undesirable result. Heroes try to avoid knocking their opponents off a cliff or into a vat of plot fluid; some fragile objects are supposed to be kept intact; some teammates get downright cranky when your opponent …

  • Take Away

    Not necessarily the food variety! A *Take Away* is an attempt to grab an object or item away from another Character in combat. Take Aways are most frequently used to deprive an opponent of his weapons or [[Gadget | Gadgets]]. The attacker must specify …

  • Teamwork in Combat

    One of the many advantages to the Characters of being in a super-team is that they start learning ways to combine their respective abilities to really put a smiting on opponents. How many times do we remember Colossus and Wolverine using the "Fastball …

  • Throwing Things

    We all know about Killer Croc and "Almost Got 'Im". Here's how he did it: The AV of the attack equals the thrower's Dex. The EV of the attack equals the thrower's Str. What's the difference, given a Character with unchanging Dex and Str, between …

  • Power Tricks

    In _Blood of Heroes_, this is actually titled "Trick Powers", which doesn't really describe the situation: the character is trying a trick with his power, not necessarily doing a "superpowered trick". Pulling off such a stunt will cost Hero Points. …

  • The Puff Puff Give Rule

    I don't know what _you're_ smoking, that you would come up with this insane idea, but it inevitably leads to only two questions: 1: Why aren't you passing it around to the rest of the gaming group? 2: You don't *really* think the GM is going to let …

  • What'll It Cost Me

    This is a mostly-straight adaptation of an optional rule in the original DC Heroes (MEGS) books. ==== The GM may allow the Players to spend Hero Points to alter the actual playing environment to suit their fancy, in essence combining the GURPS " …

  • The Rule of Maximum Drek

    Taken from ShadowRun, this rule simply resolves any math complex enough to leave fractions in a system based on whole numbers: Round in the direction that goes worst for the Player in question . More generally, on an Internet where a lot of …

  • Team Attack

    In the official Mayfair rules (page 102 of the 3rd Edition rules, if you're curious), here's what happens when Player Characters decide to combine their efforts on a single combatant: Everybody contributing to the Team Attack effort goes on the lowest …

  • Subplots

    In many tabletop roleplaying games, a player character starts play with a scattering of problems that can complicate their lives, and gains more (while hopefully concluding some of the original ones) over the course of play. These are represented as some …

  • Gadgets made a little simpler

    Or: "Jesus Christ, it's a Gadget! Get in the car!" ==== To sum up: * Gadgets can have almost any power a PC can have. * Gadgets that are mystical are actually Artifacts. * Gadgets are often [[Making the Damn Thing | cheaper]] than just buying the …

  • Making the Damn Thing

    Does the character have *Gadgetry*? If yes, proceed through the Five-Step Process below. If not, experience Tough Noogies, then go find a Gadgeteer. *1. Design the Gadget, and decide whether or not it can be Taken Away in …

  • Can R'ms'y fix it

    Damaged Gadgets must be Repaired. It doesn't do much good to carry a device that doesn't work. Each of a Gadget's Abilities must be repaired separately, with a Dice Action of the Gadgetry Skill as the AV/EV versus the +starting AP value+ of the Ability …

  • Too busted to Repair

    A Gadget is completely destroyed if its Current Body Condition is reduced to a negative more extreme than the absolute value of its starting APs. On the plus side, the notes for creating the Gadget already exists -- the Player did save that Gadget …

  • Laboratories

    See [[House Rules]] for the effect, in our campaign, of a Laboratory [[Workshops Make it Better | on the actual cost]] of the Gadget being made. ==== Laboratories or Workshops, depending on the preference of the Gadgeteer, make Gadget production …

  • Workshops Make it Better

    In the original version of the rules, any [[Gadgets made a little simpler | Gadgetry Check]] made outside of a [[Laboratories | Lab]] with a sufficiently high rating will have its OV and RV increased by + 2 Column Shifts. Instead of making Labs "more …

  • House Rules

    Sometimes, the way situations are handled by the rulebook doesn't really suit our gaming group; we've developed House Rules to cover that. One good example of that is the *Team Rule*: the GMs really, really prefer that every PC be a member of a Superhero …

  • Restricted Powers

    Some of the powers in the MEGS ruleset are there because one system has to cover a range from Robin the Boy Wonder up through Darkseid and Mr. Mxyzptlk. We aren't running the upper end of that range, so some of the powers listed in the book are not …

  • Omni-Gadgets

    I hate these. Seriously hate. ==== Omni-Gadgets simulate the Batman's utility belt, basically, although they can also be used to cover MacGuyvering in general. (In our campaign, we tend to handle MacGuyvering by using the [[What'll It Cost Me | " …

  • Teamwork is the Answer

    At least, Orko thinks so, and damn near everything he touched in Man-at-Arms' workshop went BOOM. If multiple Characters with the Gadgetry Skill are all working on a single Gadget at the same time, they have several options. Either one gadgeteer can …

  • Upgrades and Fine-Tuning

    It is, in fact, possible to install another Ability to an already existing and functioning Gadget at some time after creation. Resolve such an attempt through all the [[Making the Damn Thing | Making a Gadget]] steps, as though the new parts of the Gadget …

  • Perception Check

    One of the things that separates Player Characters from average citizens is that a Player Character's stats are not all 2. Another thing that separates Player Characters from average citizens is that a Player Character _theoretically_ has an amazing …

  • stealth

    *Stealth* is a Character's ability to move silently and without being seen by other Characters. The APs of Thief are used as the OV/RV against Perception Checks made to discover the stealthful Character. Positive RAPs indicate success in locating the …

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